Tag Archives: thyroid

Reader Question About DHEA and Energy Levels

A male reader recently wrote Dr. Stanton for advice on DHEA and how to help his energy levels.

Q. I’ve started taking DHEA. I used to take 7 keto DHEA and it helped me get rid of ice cold feet…so I figured it helped my thyroid. I don’t feel the energy effects of co enzyme q 10 anymore. What could be my problem? Also brisk 20 minute walks are not helping my energy anymore, do you have any suggestions that would be helpful thru your newsletters for men?

A. The 7-keto DHEA you have been taking may be helping you by supporting your adrenal glands. Your adrenal glands produce DHEA and cortisol which are part of your “fight or flight” response. I you have had stressors of any kind (emotional, physical such as an injury or surgery, food allergy, etc) it can tax your adrenal glands. This can produce fatigue, difficulty concentrating, weight gain, low libido and a number of other symptoms. Your adrenal and thyroid glands are closely connected so, by supporting your adrenals, you may have helped your thyroid which would have improved your cold feet.

The reason the CoQ10 and brisk walks may no longer be “working” is that your adrenals may need even more support. I would encourage you to continue the CoQ10 and walks. However, you may want to consider hormone testing to evaluate your adrenals (www.ZRTLab.com) and see if they need more support.

Sincerely,
Alicia Stanton, MD

Keeping Your Home Toxic-Free During the Holidays

We come into contact with environmental toxins in our everyday lives, but the holiday season can bring additional toxins that can further wreak havoc on our hormones. Many of these toxins can mimic other hormones like estrogen and thyroid which lead to an imbalance with other hormones. Some toxins can accumulate in tissues of glands, which inhibits our hormone production.

Toxins can be found in some holiday decorations and products. Synthetic scents from holiday air fresheners and scented candles contain phthalates and parabens that can disrupt hormones. Instead, light candles made from soy or beeswax. They burn clean and don’t emit dangerous chemicals. Excess Christmas tree trim and cinnamon sticks also work well to make your house smell like the holidays.

Fake trees – especially older ones – decorations and gift wrap can contain lead. Instead of using artificial decorations, create centerpieces and holiday accents by placing poinsettias around your house and filling baskets and vases with natural ingredients like pinecones, whole walnuts and chestnuts, artichokes, cranberries, cinnamon sticks, organic pumpkins, squash and apples. If you prefer a fake tree, try to use a newer one as they generally contain lower levels of lead and make sure to wash your hands well after assembling and decorating.

I hope these tips have helped so you can protect your home and your health this holiday season with decorations that are both beautiful and healthful.